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This Living Century: The Australians

 

On the 28/8/99 a colour supplement titled This Living Century appeared in The Australian Newspaper. It was the final part of a 12 part series that focused on the people who had shaped this century. This final edition chose the ten most influential Australians in eleven categories including The Adventurers.

Tim Macartney-Snape was chosen as one of this century’s ten most outstanding Australian Adventurers.

The Adventurers Image

EXPLORATION AND adventure in the 20th century are vastly different from the purely nationalistic, economic and geographic enterprises we know from the 19th century. Now it is more individual, even eccentric, but the deeds of expedition members continue to entertain and inspire those of us who remain at home. For this list the adventure/explorers must have: become or have the potential to become inspirational symbols; risked something, or moved out of the ordinary flow of life; travelled in unexplored territory; organised the trips mainly in Australia, and with Australian support; contributed more than an inspirational voyage(s) to our dreams and expectations, and offer something of their determination and skill back to us in the form of creativity, organisational success or administrative achievement. This list should be seen as representative rather than exclusive. Those who nearly made it include adventurer Peter Treseder, sailor lan Kiernan and travellers Sorrel Wilby and Robyn Davidson. I wanted to, but could not include one of my favourites, gold-seeker Harold Lasseter. - STEPHEN MARTIN

Tim Macartney-Snape 1956-

IN 1990, A QUIET and determined man, Tim Macartney-Snape, walked from the shores of Bangladesh to Mt Everest, a l000km journey across the Indian plateau. But that was only the beginning: he then climbed the mountain unassisted, reaching the summit on May 11, 1990, without benefit of the oxygen tanks that so many other mountaineers consider vital. It was his second successful ascent of Everest. Macartney-Snape’s trip stands out in an age when the climb has become so crowded that the final leg has to be booked in and organised with a queue of other climbers. Macartney-Snape once wrote that adventure, as one form of the search to understand the truth, should be vigorously defended. He continues to strive for change and inspiration, teaching as co founder of the Foundation for Humanity’s Adulthood.